May 26, 2019 News Magazine
Latest stories

First American site bug exposed 885 million sensitive title insurance records

May 24, 2019

May 24, 2019

News just in from security reporter Brian Krebs: Fortune 500 real estate insurance giant First American exposed approximately 885 million...

How to see another company’s growth tactics and try them yourself

May 24, 2019

May 24, 2019

Julian Shapiro Contributor Share on Twitter Julian Shapiro is the founder of BellCurve.com, a growth marketing agency that trains you to become a marketing professional. He also writes at Julian.com. More posts by this contributor How do you hire a great growth marketer? How do startups actually get their content marketing to work? Every company’s online acquisition strategy is out in the open. If you know where to look. This post shows you exactly where to look, and how to reverse engineer their growth tactics. Why is this important? Competitive analysis de-risks your own growth experiments: You find the best growth ideas to adopt and the worst ones to avoid. First, a warning: Your goal is not to repurpose another company’s hard work. That makes you a thief. Your goal is to identify other companies who face the same growth challenges as you, then to study their approaches for solutions to draw from. As..

How to see another company’s growth tactics and try them yourself

May 24, 2019

May 24, 2019

Julian Shapiro Contributor Share on Twitter Julian Shapiro is the founder of BellCurve.com, a growth marketing agency that trains you...

‘Observation’ is a tense, atmospheric puzzler where you play a modern HAL 9000

May 24, 2019

May 24, 2019

When you watch 2001: A Space Odyssey, do you find yourself criticizing HAL 9000’s machinations and thinking, “I could do...

CoinBits launches as a passive investment app for bitcoin

May 24, 2019

May 24, 2019

Erik Finman is a twenty-something bitcoin maximalist as famous for his precocity as he is for his $12 bet on the currency a few years ago. Now, Finman, who built his first company while still in high school, is launching a new startup called CoinBits, which allows users to passively invest in bitcoin. The idea, according to Finman, is to democratize access to the currency by letting everyday folks invest nominal sums through well-known mechanisms like roundups on transactions made with a credit or debit card or through regular transactions from a customer’s savings or checking account to bitcoin through CoinBits. Every transaction also helps Finman’s own bitcoin holdings grow, and makes the young entrepreneur a little wealthier himself through his bitcoin holdings. Users can make one-time investments of $10, $25, $50 or $100 through the web-based platform and can establish a level of risk for their holdings. Finman’s app collects no commissions on transactions, and 98% of the bitc..

Coinbits launches as a passive investment app for bitcoin

May 24, 2019

May 24, 2019

Erik Finman is a twenty-something bitcoin maximalist as famous for his precocity as he is for his $12 bet on...

Livekick raises $3M to use live video for one-on-one training

May 24, 2019

May 24, 2019

Livekick, a startup that gives customers access to one-on-one personal training and yoga from their home (or hotel room, or elsewhere), is announcing that it has raised $3 million in seed funding. The company was founded by entrepreneur Yarden Tadmor and fitness expert Shayna Schmidt. Tadmor said that with all his travel for work, his fitness routine “really eroded,” so he contacted Schmidt and asked her to train him remotely — they’d connect via FaceTime, he’d mount his phone at the gym and she’d supervise his workout. “We trained this way for a while, and then we realized: Hey, this is something that other people can really benefit from,” Tadmor said. So with Livekick, users can sign up for one, two or three live, 30-minute sessions with a remote trainer, who they’ll connect with via the Livekick iOS app or website. (After a two-week trial, pricing starts at $32 per week.) The workouts will be tailored to the space and equipment that you have access to, and the trainers will also ..

Livekick raises $3M to use live video for one-on-one training

May 24, 2019

May 24, 2019

Livekick, a startup that gives customers access to one-on-one personal training and yoga from their home (or hotel room, or...

SpaceX reveals more Starlink info after launch of first 60 satellites

May 24, 2019

May 24, 2019

Last night’s successful Starlink launch was a big one for SpaceX — its heaviest payload ever, weighed down by 60...

CFIUS Cometh: What this Obscure Agency Does and Why It Matters to Your Fund or Startup

May 24, 2019

May 24, 2019

Evan J. Zimmerman Contributor Evan J. Zimmerman is an entrepreneur, investor, and writer. He is the Chairman of Jovono and Chairman of the Clinton Health Access Initiative technology council. He is a partner and director in Mighty Mug/Mighty Products, Inc, and chairman of Brush Up Club, an innovative oral health company. On January 12, 2016, Grindr announced it had sold a 60% controlling stake in the company to Beijing Kunlun Tech, a Chinese gaming firm, valuing the company at $155 million. Champagne bottles were surely popped at the small-ish firm. Though not at a unicorn-level valuation, the 9-figure exit was still respectable and signaled a bright future for the gay hookup app. Indeed, two years later, Kunlun bought the rest of the firm at more than double the valuation and was planning a public offering for Grindr. On March 27, 2019, it all fell apart. Kunlun was putting Grindr up for sale instead. What went wrong? It wasn’t that Grindr’s business ground ..