May 26, 2019 News Magazine

Microsoft open-sources a crucial algorithm behind its Bing Search services

Microsoft today announced that it has open-sourced a key piece of what makes its Bing search services able to quickly return search results to its users. By making this technology open, the company hopes that developers will be able to build similar experiences for their users in other domains where users search through vast data troves, including in retail, though in this age of abundant data, chances are developers will find plenty of other enterprise and consumer use cases, too.

The piece of software the company open-sourced today is a library Microsoft developed to make better use of all the data it collected and AI models it built for Bing .

“Only a few years ago, web search was simple. Users typed a few words and waded through pages of results,” the company notes in today’s announcement. “Today, those same users may instead snap a picture on a phone and drop it into a search box or use an intelligent assistant to ask a question without physically touching a device at all. They may also type a question and expect an actual reply, not a list of pages with likely answers.”

With the Space Partition Tree and Graph (SPTAG) algorithm that is at the core of the open-sourced Python library, Microsoft is able to search through billions of pieces of information in milliseconds.

Vector search itself isn’t a new idea, of course. What Microsoft has done, though, is apply this concept to working with deep learning models. First, the team takes a pre-trained model and encodes that data into vectors, where every vector represents a word or pixel. Using the new SPTAG library, it then generates a vector index. As queries come in, the deep learning model translates that text or image into a vector and the library finds the most related vectors in that index.

“With Bing search, the vectorizing effort has extended to over 150 billion pieces of data indexed by the search engine to bring improvement over traditional keyword matching,” Microsoft says. “These include single words, characters, web page snippets, full queries and other media. Once a user searches, Bing can scan the indexed vectors and deliver the best match.”

The library is now available under the MIT license and provides all of the tools to build and search these distributed vector indexes. You can find more details about how to get started with using this library — as well as application samples — here.


Source: TechCrunch

Tags: in Uncategorized
Banner
Related Posts

How German and US authorities took down the owners of darknet drug emporium Wall Street Market

May 3, 2019

May 3, 2019

The major darknet marketplace known as the Wall Street Market have been seized and its alleged operators arrested in a...

My little robot dude

March 9, 2019

March 9, 2019

It was only a matter of time before I let a robot enter my apartment and run wild. Roomba’s have...

WeWork could challenge Starbucks in China with new on-demand service

January 29, 2019

January 29, 2019

The rise of Starbucks in China, like that in the west, is closely linked to its function as a “third...

India’s Mswipe raises $30M to grow its smart point-of-sale terminal business

April 2, 2019

April 2, 2019

Mswipe, an Indian fintech company that develops point-of-sale terminals for merchants, has pulled $30 million in new funding as it...

An unsecured SMS spam operation doxxed its owners

May 9, 2019

May 9, 2019

A massive SMS spamming operation kicked out tens of millions of text messages, pestering unsuspecting recipients with links to fake...

Proof of Capital is a new $50M blockchain fund that’s backed by HTC

April 17, 2019

April 17, 2019

It’s often said that the dramatic fall of crypto prices last year ushered in a new era for technology-focused startups...

Luna Display updates its video engine for faster performance

January 24, 2019

January 24, 2019

Astro, the company behind Luna Display and Astropad, is releasing a major software update that will drastically improve performance. According...

Helping children overcome their mobility challenges, Trexo Robotics gets a Y Combinator boost

February 25, 2019

February 25, 2019

Manmeet Maggu and Rahul Udasi didn’t know it when they met at the University of Waterloo 11 years ago, but...

Apple’s iOS will now confirm you meant to subscribe to that app

April 12, 2019

April 12, 2019

Apple has added another step to prevent users from accidentally signing up for an iOS app’s subscription – or, from...

How Amazon took 50% of the e-commerce market and what it means for the rest of us

February 27, 2019

February 27, 2019

Jun-Sheng Li Contributor Jun-Sheng (Jun) Li is an Executive in Residence at Canvas Ventures and was the former senior vice...

Startup Law A to Z: Corporate Matters

February 19, 2019

February 19, 2019

Founders are a special breed — independent, self-reliant, and resourceful. Yet these same attributes, critical in taking an idea from...

Daimler and BMW invest $1.1 billion in urban mobility services

February 22, 2019

February 22, 2019

Daimler AG and BMW Group officially agreed to merge their urban mobility services into a single holding company back in...

C2A raises $6.5M for its in-car cybersecurity platform

February 11, 2019

February 11, 2019

Cars are now essentially computers on wheels — and like every computer, they are susceptible to attacks. It’s no surprise...

Google will start retiring Hangouts for G Suite users in October

January 22, 2019

January 22, 2019

Google’s strategy around its consumer messaging services remains baffling, especially since it killed off Allo (yet kept Duo on life...

Verified Expert Lawyer: Andrew Erskine

February 27, 2019

February 27, 2019

Andrew Erskine has developed his legal career along with the rise of the tech startup scene in Los Angeles. Today,...

Comments
Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *