November 19, 2019 News Magazine

Judge dismisses Oracle lawsuit over $10B Pentagon JEDI cloud contract

Oracle has been complaining about the procurement process around the Pentagon’s $10 billion, decade-long JEDI cloud contract, even before the DoD opened requests for proposals last year. It went so far as to file a lawsuit in December, claiming a potential conflict of interest on the part of a procurement team member. Today, that case was dismissed in federal court.

In dismissing the case, Federal Claims Court Senior Judge Eric Bruggink ruled that the company had failed to prove a conflict in the procurement process, something the DOD’s own internal audits found in two separate investigations. Judge Bruggink ultimately agreed with the DoD’s findings.

“We conclude as well that the contracting officer’s findings that an organizational conflict of interest does not exist and that individual conflicts of interest did not impact the procurement, were not arbitrary, capricious, an abuse of discretion, or otherwise not in accordance with law. Plaintiff’s motion for judgment on the administrative record is therefore denied,” Judge Bruggink wrote in his order.

The company previously had filed a failed protest with the Government Accountability Office (GAO), which also ruled that the procurement process was fair and didn’t favor any particular vendor. Oracle had claimed that the process was designed to favor cloud market leader AWS.

It’s worth noting that the employee in question was a former AWS employee. AWS joined the lawsuit as part of the legal process, stating at the time in the legal motion, “Oracle’s Complaint specifically alleges conflicts of interest involving AWS. Thus, AWS has direct and substantial economic interests at stake in this case, and its disposition clearly could impair those interests.”

Today’s ruling opens the door for the announcement of a winner of the $10 billion contract, as early as next month. The DoD previously announced that it had chosen Microsoft and Amazon as the two finalists for the winner-take-all bid.


Source: TechCrunch

Tags: in Uncategorized
Banner
Related Posts

MIT develops tiny ‘walking’ motor that helps more complex robots self-assemble

July 2, 2019

July 2, 2019

It’s becoming increasingly apparent that robots of the future will be less ‘Wall-E’ and more ‘Voltron meets ant swarm’ –...

Tesla Model Y orders are now open

March 15, 2019

March 15, 2019

Customers can already place an order for the Tesla Model Y, a mid-sized crossover SUV that won’t go into production...

Adobe Lightroom arrives in the Mac App Store

June 20, 2019

June 20, 2019

The pro-focused photo editing tool Lightroom is now available on the Mac App Store, marking the first major Adobe app...

Where top VCs are investing in edtech

October 1, 2019

October 1, 2019

Education is a $4 trillion market globally in urgent need of overall — so where within education are top venture...

Meet the tiny startup that helped build Amazon’s Scout robot

February 7, 2019

February 7, 2019

When Amazon unveiled a six-wheeled urban delivery robot called Scout a couple of weeks ago, its website was pretty definitive...

Amazon joins SpaceX, OneWeb, and Facebook in the race to create space-based internet services

April 4, 2019

April 4, 2019

Amazon is officially joining the race to create a network of satellites in low earth orbit that will provide high-speed...

Is a $600 smart oven ever worth it?

May 19, 2019

May 19, 2019

Part of closely following tech is the often mistaken belief that newer, better technologies can help right some of the...

Powerbeats Pro are the Bluetooth earbuds to beat

May 17, 2019

May 17, 2019

Let’s get the bad out of the way first, shall we? For starters, that charging case is huge. There’s no...

Transportation weekly: Nuro dreams of autonomous lattes, what is a metamaterial, Volvo takes the wheel

March 24, 2019

March 24, 2019

Welcome back to Transportation Weekly; I’m your host Kirsten Korosec, senior transportation reporter at TechCrunch. We love the reader feedback....

NASA’s Dragonfly will fly across the surface of Titan, Saturn’s ocean moon

June 27, 2019

June 27, 2019

NASA has just announced its next big interplanetary mission: Dragonfly, which will deliver a Mars Rover-sized flying vehicle to the...

IPOs are the beginning, not the end

October 19, 2019

October 19, 2019

Earlier this month at TechCrunch Disrupt San Francisco, we sat down with Box’s Aaron Levie and PagerDuty’s Jennifer Tejada to...

Startup Law A to Z: Regulatory Compliance

April 4, 2019

April 4, 2019

Startups are but one species in a complex regulatory and public policy ecosystem. This ecosystem is larger and more powerfully...

With China tariffs delayed, Beijing faces startup dilemma

February 25, 2019

February 25, 2019

China is facing a challenging juxtaposition in the coming years: can the government remain in control of business and media...

Luna is a new kind of space company helping biotech find its footing in microgravity

November 19, 2019

November 19, 2019

Toronto-based startup Luna Design and Innovation is a prime example of the kind of space company that is increasingly starting...

Verified Expert Lawyer: Leslee Cohen

February 25, 2019

February 25, 2019

Leslee Cohen has been practicing law for decades in her hometown of Chicago. She’s been working with more and more...

Comments
Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *